Become an Economics Major

Become an Economics Major
An aerial view of Peter T. Paul College in the fall

An economics major provides one of the most secure and well-paid career paths available. If you are interested in the business, political, or the social world around you, economics may be for you. Adding economics to your current major can increase your expected salary upon graduation between 16% to 25% depending on your current major.  (Click one of the buttons below for details.)  As a Paul College student you can take advantage of our professional advising, internships, and career offices. You also have the opportunity to utilize your skills by working on real business and industry client problems at the Center for Business Analytics

An economics major can open doors for you in diverse industries and careers such as economic policy, finance, business consulting, economic consulting, environmental consulting, sports analytics, business analytics, and management. Economics can help your find your professional path.

 

 

Economics Can Pair With Any Major and Increase Earning Potential 

Are You a Liberal Arts Major Interested in Economics?

The liberal arts tradition is strong and proud. The B.A. in Economics is a liberal arts major.  The liberal arts are where we learn about our world and how to make continuous improvements in our social institutions. Economics is dedicated to the task of understanding when outcomes need improving and how to find the best possible solutions. Economics is where the humanitarian and the businessperson meet to improve outcomes.   

Choosing economics as a second major also is of high value once you graduate. Data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey (2021-2022) reveal that adding economics as a second major to a liberal arts degree improves wages for graduates aged between 25 to 29 by 16% over a single liberal arts major. By mid-career, this differential return increases to 18%. Compared to graduates with two general liberal arts majors, the liberal arts-economics combination increases wages by 21% initially and by 22% by mid-career. By comparison, the choice of liberal arts and a business degree increases wages by about 9% compared with a liberal arts degree alone. For liberal arts majors, economics builds the additional skills that pay.[1]

If you think that you might be interested in pursuing a B.A. in Economics, you can email Professor Robert Mohr for additional information at Robert.Mohr@unh.edu

 

[1] Numbers are compiled in Tebaldi and Elmslie (2024).  Complete results available upon request. 

Are You a Business Admin Major Interested in Economics?

Are you thinking about options and dual options within your Paul College Business Administration degree? How about economics as a second major? You have probably taken our sequence in the principles of economics and learned about business decision making, how differences in market structure can change business decisions, and how the macroeconomic environment impacts the decisions that business leaders need to make.  An understanding of economics is fundamental to business success. But one eternal question coming from business majors is, "How will an economics degree help me when I graduate, and why choose economics rather than a second business administration option?"

New findings from the U.S. Census American Community Survey (2021-2022) can help answer these questions. A business major combined with an economics major increases wages by 22% compared with those with a business degree alone. This differential remains consistent throughout all age groups to 60+.  Compared to graduates with two business degrees or Options, this differential return is 9%.    Does economics pique your interest?  If so, choosing economics as a second major can also improve your skills in a manner that employers will find attractive.[1]

If you think that you might be interested in pursuing a B.A .in Economics, you can email Professor Robert Mohr for additional information at Robert.Mohr@unh.edu

 

[1] Numbers are compiled in Tebaldi and Elmslie (2024).  Complete results available upon request. 

Are you a STEM major thinking about a second major in Economics? 

Our B.S. in Analytical Economics or our B.A. in Economics may be for you. Our general economics degree will have fewer additional credit hour requirements. Maybe you are interested in a second STEM major or in a second major in business. What are the differential returns to each option?

New Findings from the U.S. Census American Community Survey (2021-2022) can help answer these questions. For new graduates aged 24 to 29, a STEM + STEM degree increases wages by 8% compared with a single STEM degree. By combining a STEM degree with a business degree, increases wages by 15%. But STEM combined with an economics degree increases wages by 25% compared with a STEM only degree.  And this higher wage premium remains consistent throughout all career age groups from 24 to 60+. Choosing economics as a second major can improve your skills in a manner that employers will find attractive.[1]  The returns are in!

If you think that you might be interested in pursuing a B.S. or B.A. in Economics, you can email Professor Robert Mohr for additional information at Robert.Mohr@unh.edu

 

[1] Numbers are compiled in Tebaldi and Elmslie (2024).  Complete results available upon request.